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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2007
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Dr. Dyrc Sibrans, who has been creating decoys and carved wood pieces for 25 years, will have 132 wildlife pieces on display starting Saturday at Carnegie Visual Arts Center. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
Daily photo by Brennen Smith
Dr. Dyrc Sibrans, who has been creating decoys and carved wood pieces for 25 years, will have 132 wildlife pieces on display starting Saturday at Carnegie Visual Arts Center. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

Wildlife exhibit of carvings, paintings at Carnegie

By Patrice Stewart
pstewart@decaturdaily.com 340-2446

Ducks, geese, seagulls and hummingbirds will take over the Carnegie Visual Arts Center on Saturday, along with buffalo, elk and trout.

The wood carvings and oil paintings of Dyrc Sibrans, a retired Decatur physician, will be featured in "Wildlife in Woods." This exhibit will run through Nov. 27.

Sibrans, who has been creating decoys and carved wood pieces for 25 years, will have 132 pieces on display.

That includes paintings of wildlife and landscapes, a second hobby he took up after retiring in 2001, when his wife, Anita, gave him an easel, paints and brushes.

He likes "the unlimited scenes in Montana" and the coast of Alabama for subject material. "They have proven to be wonderful subjects, allowing me to be outside and to occasionally incorporate wild animals into the scenes," said Sibrans.

"I am trying to make my paintings loose and more impressionistic as a counter balance to the very exacting reproduction of my carvings," he said.

His oil paintings also include lighthouses at Okracoke and Cape Hatteras off the North Carolina coast and scenes from Alabama's Bon Secour and Fort Morgan coastal areas. They have intriguing names such as "Post Ivan" and "Calm Before the Storm."

Kathy Silvestri, exhibits coordinator for the Carnegie, said three types of decoys are on display.

"There are the working decoys that might be thrown out in the water, the mantel decoys and the realistic decoys with feather marks," she said.

Some are mounted on top of coral or petrified wood, while others are displayed with sand and shells.

And when you find a blue wing teal drake or mallard drake, you'll also see the hen. They share exhibit space with hummingbirds, quail and mourning doves.

He taught himself wood carving by getting the basics from a book before starting to create functional decoys for himself and other duck hunters. That evolved into carving and painting realistic ducks, geese and birds. He took awards at shows, including Decatur's Southern Wildlife Festival, which he organized.

Sibrans was asked to carve a bird as an ornament for the White House Christmas tree in 2002 and produced a 6-inch chickadee, the smallest bird he had ever carved.

A South Carolina native, he practiced internal medicine and rheumatology in Decatur for 30 years.

The artist will be honored Nov. 16 during the monthly "Third Friday at 5" reception for Carnegie members.

Call 341-0562 for more information.

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