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SUNDAY, AUGUST 26, 2007
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VALLEY OF YEARS PAST
Mary Lott

This photo was reversed in the Aug. 19 edition of <I>The Daily</I>. Decatur officials joined members of the Decatur Kiwanis Club at City Hall’s flagpole to inspect a sample of American flags that the civic club was selling to raise funds to support its charitable activities. Holding the flag are Kiwanis president John Eyster, left, and Decatur Mayor Murray Dodd, right. Back row, from left, are Rex Pou, A.J. Coleman, Bob McWhorter (sale chairman), Paul Robinson, Commissioner Wilson Morgan, Jim Duncan, Ray White and Commissioner Jack Higginbotham. This photo appeared in <I>The Decatur Daily</I> on April 27, 1962. The Daily regrets the error and is glad to set the record straight.
Daily file photo
This photo was reversed in the Aug. 19 edition of The Daily. Decatur officials joined members of the Decatur Kiwanis Club at City Hall’s flagpole to inspect a sample of American flags that the civic club was selling to raise funds to support its charitable activities. Holding the flag are Kiwanis president John Eyster, left, and Decatur Mayor Murray Dodd, right. Back row, from left, are Rex Pou, A.J. Coleman, Bob McWhorter (sale chairman), Paul Robinson, Commissioner Wilson Morgan, Jim Duncan, Ray White and Commissioner Jack Higginbotham. This photo appeared in The Decatur Daily on April 27, 1962. The Daily regrets the error and is glad to set the record straight.

Women try to boost employment in ’32 with ship/shop plan

75 years ago

Aug. 20-26, 1932

Decatur women organized to go door-to-door in the city to boost employment. They launched a “back to the rail” movement designed to help curb unemployment by increasing railroad activity in the area.

Their slogan was “You ship with us, we shop with you.”

Mrs. Charles Wiggins and Mrs. Joseph Pettey spoke about business loss causing drop in rail revenue.

The cotton mills of Alabama ranked third in the U.S. with a total of 332,382 active hours for the 1,623,244 cotton spinning spindles that were active during the month. Tennessee and South Carolina were the top two.

The mills in the South jumped ahead of New England mills, reporting an average of 160 active hours for every spindle in place versus 45 active hours in the New England states.

50 years ago

Aug. 20-26, 1957

Russell’s Minnow Pool team won the play-off championship of the 1957’s Girls Softball League. Members were Donna Edwards, Nancy Edwards, Johnnie Howard, Alma Suggs, Myrt Salter, Wimbreth Melton, Orpha Melton, Shirley Wooten, Martha McCann, Betty Bowling, Doris Hughes, Babye Ann Terry, Faye Turney and Nancy Ward. Myron Melton was the coach, John Lomartire was manager, and Donnie Howard was the bat boy.

Carolyn Carter of Town Creek was crowned Lawrence County’s 1957 Maid of Cotton.

25 years ago

Aug. 20-26, 1982

Sixteen giggling, blushing girls — members of the Hartselle Ponytail World Series championship softball team — were the center of attention at the City Council meeting.

City Hall was packed with people who stood up and clapped for the squad.

The council passed a resolution commending the members for the fame and honor they brought to Hartselle by winning the World Series.

The council also recognized coaches, Larry Slater and Charles House, and manager Jimmy Slaughter.

Larry Peterman of Decatur took his chicken recipe “Pecan Country Chicken,” to the finals of the National Chicken Cooking Contest in Dallas. Peterman, who won the Alabama preliminary contest two years in a row, represented the state in the national contest.

10 years ago

Aug. 20-26, 1997

Auburn University started awarding five outstanding students with full tuition for one school year, all in the name of a Hartselle native.

Southern Progress Corp., a Birmingham-based publishing firm, established a $250,000 endowment in honor of former chief executive officer Don Logan.

The Don Logan Endowed Scholarships provided students with three academic quarters of tuition and book expenses. The scholarships were awarded to students pursuing degrees in horticulture, landscape architecture, marketing/advertising, journalism and nutrition/food sciences.

Logan joined Southern Progress as data processing manager in 1970 and quickly rose through company ranks. After transforming the company’s struggling book operation into a major profit center, he assumed broader corporate responsibilities, becoming chairman and chief executive officer in 1986. Time Inc. tapped him as president and chief operating officer in 1992.

Two years later, he was named CEO of Time Inc., the largest magazine publisher in the world.

The Hartselle native graduated magna cum laude from Auburn with a degree in mathematics in 1966.

Donna Reed, 39, activated a dream when the Decatur Chamber of Commerce staged a ribbon-cutting ceremony at her beauty salon, Hair Expressions, formerly The Beauty Bar, on Johnston Street.

While at Austin High School, Reed attended classes in the morning and trained to be a barber in the afternoons at Calhoun Community College.

Two weeks after graduating from Austin, she picked up her barber’s certificate at Calhoun and then passed the state board exam in Montgomery for her license.

She worked at Family Affair beauty salon where she was an apprentice and earned her beautician’s license.

She worked at numerous other places before hearing a whisper that The Beauty Bar might be available. Its former owner, Ruby Preston, a hair dresser in Decatur since 1941, wanted to sell it.

“I was determined to one day operate my own place and didn’t feel I had time to waste,” Reed said.

MARY LOTT

The Daily welcomes the loan of vintage photos of people, places and events in Morgan, Limestone and Lawrence counties for use in “Valley ofYears Past.”Please call Mary Lott at 340-2452 or e-mail her at mary.lott@decaturdaily.com. Photos will be returned.

Mary Lott Mary Lott
DAILY Staff Writer

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