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Alabama State Troopers Kerry Horton, top left, and Steven James aided in the birth of baby Jorjha Miree on Wednesday. They are with father Reco Miree, mother Tanya Miree, grandmother Debra Miree and great-grandmother Louise Cleveland.
AP photo by Donnie Coffee Jr.
Alabama State Troopers Kerry Horton, top left, and Steven James aided in the birth of baby Jorjha Miree on Wednesday. They are with father Reco Miree, mother Tanya Miree, grandmother Debra Miree and great-grandmother Louise Cleveland.

Troopers aid with birth on U.S. 80

SELMA (AP) — A Selma woman gave birth in a Ford Explorer with the help of two state troopers, who only had a roll of paper towels to handle the emergency delivery.

Reco and Tanya Miree and 2-year-old son Chase were on their way to a 3:30 p.m. doctor's appointment Wednesday, but the baby wouldn't wait.

"I called my mama and said we need to do something because she was having a baby," the father said.

He got off the phone and spotted troopers Kerry Horton and Steven James, who were wrapping up a traffic stop on U.S. 80 at 3:35 p.m. James said the Explorer came by with flashers on.

"The guy says, 'My wife is having a baby!' Just crazy yelling. And we say, 'Pull over! We'll get you some help! Just get off the road!' "

Horton called for an ambulance, but the birth of little Jorjha Miree was under way.

"So I run to my car to try to find some blankets or towels and I can't find anything but a new roll of paper towels," James told the Selma Times-Journal for a story Friday.

Jorjha (pronounced Georgia) was born at approximately 3:37 p.m, weighing in at seven pounds and six ounces.

"While Reco's holding the baby I take a napkin and clean the baby's mouth as best we can," James said.

The father barely tapped the baby's back.

"I said, 'Look man, hit the baby on the back! The baby just hit the floorboard. You're not going to hurt the baby'," James said.

And with four or five taps, James said, "the baby takes a big, deep breath and the baby's crying. I said if the baby's crying, we're good."

The troopers comforted the frantic couple until the ambulance arrived and took them to Vaughan Regional Medical Center.

"You see it on TV all the time, but who would think you'd get up, put on this uniform and deliver a baby,?" said Horton.

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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