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Sons of a goat: Baasheba's two young kids have the run of the farmyard at Chet Ellis' Decatur farm Friday. Decatur's famous  getaway goat gave birth to the two billy goats Wednesday night.
Daily photo by Jonathan Palmer
Sons of a goat: Baasheba's two young kids have the run of the farmyard at Chet Ellis' Decatur farm Friday. Decatur's famous getaway goat gave birth to the two billy goats Wednesday night.

Getaway goat gives birth to twins
Baasheba now running nursery
Mother and kids doing fine on farm; missing father believed to be White Boer

By Danielle Komis Palmer
dpalmer@decaturdaily.com 340-2447

Once an elusive runaway goat randomly sighted on the streets of Decatur, the city's famous Baasheba has changed her wild ways and is now the proud mother of twins.

The nanny goat's two kids scampered around Baasheba's legs Friday afternoon at owner Chet Ellis' Decatur farm. Ellis caught Baasheba earlier this month after she'd been on the loose for three weeks.

Baasheba became a celebrity after she eluded police with Tasers and animal control officers with large nets. She was spotted in numerous Southeast Decatur backyards and even at the Decatur Country Club golf course.

Her 2-day-old male twins have soft, white coats with black spots on their heads and legs. Weighing in at about only 5 pounds each, the small creatures with gangly legs began to urgently bleat for their mother after they climbed a tall woodpile and couldn't get down. The newly svelte Baasheba ran to her offspring protectively.

Baasheba birthed the twins Wednesday night on Ellis' son's farm in Oak Ridge. Ellis was out of town, but when he returned Thursday evening, his son said, "I hate to tell you this, but you're the proud daddy of twin boys."

Twins are common in goats, Ellis said. Based on their coloring, the kids' father is probably a White Boer goat with a black or red head, he guessed. Baasheba has a black coat.

While Baasheba's bulging sides were often the center of debate during the nanny goat's days on the loose, Ellis said he never wondered if she was pregnant.

"As quick as I caught her, I knew she was," he said.

"She pooched out on both sides."

Ellis' Border collie Jim cornered Baasheba two weeks ago when the spooked goat was spotted in a Southeast Decatur yard. An animal control official called Ellis after she found out he had a sheep herding dog that could likely corner Baasheba.

Ellis and Jim will demonstrate their sheep-herding skills at the Walk Your Paws fundraiser for Animal Friends Humane Society on Oct. 27 in Decatur. Baasheba will be available for photographs, along with two small white additions, Ellis said.

Ellis plans to keep the trio on his farm rather than his son's, so he can keep a close eye on them and socialize the babies with humans before the event.

As for the names of the twins, he doesn't know yet, he said.

"Billy and Billy, I guess," he said, laughing.

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