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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2007
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Although severe storms were feared in the Decatur area Thursday evening, the Tennessee River reflected a sunset amid sublime weather conditions.
Daily photo by Jonathan Palmer
Although severe storms were feared in the Decatur area Thursday evening, the Tennessee River reflected a sunset amid sublime weather conditions.

Sunny weekend likely; rain possible Monday

By Bayne Hughes
hughes@decaturdaily.com 340-2432

Valley residents should enjoy a warm and sunny weekend before rain possibly returns Monday and Tuesday.

The National Weather Service predicts that Saturday and Sunday temperatures will be in the 80s with lows in the upper 50s.

Clouds should start moving in Sunday evening and bring a 20 percent chance of rain.

Meteorologist Steve Latimer of the weather service office in Huntsville said the area would have a 50 percent chance of rain Monday and a 40 percent chance Tuesday with two mostly cloudy days. Monday's highs should be in the middle 70s and fall into the upper 60s on Tuesday. Lows both days will be in the 50s.

Alabama and Tennessee kick off Saturday at 11:30 a.m. in Tuscaloosa. Fans should enjoy a sunny day with a high of 82.

Auburn and LSU should have a clear evening in Baton Rouge, La., with lows in the 60s.

Valley residents got a welcome, although small, break from the drought Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

After receiving 0.54 inches of rain Wednesday, Pryor Field near Decatur recorded 0.12 inches Thursday and 0.10 after 12 a.m. Friday. The Huntsville weather office reports 0.69 inches of precipitation so far during October.

The Valley avoided the severe weather that many parts of the Southeast got. Latimer said a squall line reached as far north as Michigan and started in Arkansas, but died as it reached North-Central Alabama. Moulton and Lawrence County went under a tornado warning just after 2 p.m., but there were no reports of touchdowns.

"Squall lines like that are so unpredictable," Latimer said. "This narrow, severe line was moving so fast that it's difficult to estimate whether it's going to hold together and expand or dissipate as the one did Friday."

Latimer said the squall line actually stayed together a long time, but lost its energy as it got into the area. Squall lines like the one Friday do not usually produce a lot of rain.

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