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SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 2006
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Darwin's theory is not based in fact
THE DECATUR DAILY:

Every idea begins with the thinking process and so it was in 1831, with 22-year-old amateur naturalist Charles Darwin.

The idea was evolution. The theory was that the various kinds of plants and animals descended from other kinds that lived in earlier times and that the differences are due to inherited changes that occurred over many generations. You can bet a monkey's uncle it was controversial then and it remains controversial today.

Darwin's theories on evolution can be found in books and pamphlets and on TV programs, and they are taught in schools across the nation.

In 1948, the Supreme Court banned religious instruction in public schools, noting that the First Amendment requires the separation of church and state.

In the 1960s, the Supreme Court, led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, ruled that an Arkansas law prohibiting the teaching of evolution violated the First Amendment. This is when the nation started on a downward spiral (that's a story for another time). They kicked the Father, Son and Holy Ghost out of schools and brought the monkey in.

It sounds perverse to me, but the years passed and the evolution theories gained support in colleges, schools and among the intellectual crowd. There is no basis in fact for any of these theories. God is the intelligent designer, the creator of Earth, man and the universe — not some nasty, banana-eating chimp.

As things go in Monkeyshinesville, evolution has become an enterprising scheme with authors, directors and tabletop professors. Obviously, there's money to be made. Monkey business is big business in the United States.

Jimmy Robinson

Hartselle

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