News from the Tennessee Valley Opinion
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2007
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Military fought for right to clutter up property

To The Daily: I am sick and tired of the “Hiding in plain sight” in the newspaper. I was under the impression we lived in a free country (that’s what our service people fought and died for), but evidently I was wrong.

I know everyone likes a neat yard, but as long as a property owner pays taxes and doesn’t harm anyone, shouldn’t he or she have a say-so as to what is on the property?

What about the elderly and sick who can’t afford to hire someone to keep their yard perfect and their bushes trimmed, or to have old furniture or appliances moved? Does anyone check on their neighbors anymore, to find out about their situation? Maybe instead of complaining, you could help out your neighbor.

A few years ago, a neighbor complained about a house we owned. We were in the process of tearing it down as we could afford to and when my husband was not working out of town. We had to hire someone to tear it down for us and spent thousands of dollars we couldn’t afford.

And shame on Decatur to have this law, yet still have the ugly, abandoned buildings on First Avenue Southeast. A man wanted to buy one of the buildings and put in a restaurant, but the City Council wouldn’t sell it, so now it still stands abandoned and ugly.

The old Robinson Furniture building is another example of a run-down building. Also, there is the overgrown place beside Maria Bonita that distracts from their beautiful outdoor dining area.

If Decatur wants to do something, it should take care of its own backyard.

Linda D. Clemons
Hartselle

Wilson, others discount God’s infinite power

To The Daily: Interestingly, Jamie Wilson (“Creation, evolution and myth”) rebuts his own argument that we can treat a literal, six-day creation as myth: “Admittedly there are problems with such an approach, such as how does one draw the line between what can be regarded as myth and what should be considered literal history.”

If creation is a myth, let’s stop singing, “He placed the stars in the sky and he calls them by name” and many more of the songs we sing, both traditional and contemporary. Instead, let’s realize that much of the Bible is not conceivable to our finite minds: the virgin birth of Jesus, the worldwide flood, Daniel in the lions’ den, and so much more.

Sadly, an increasing number of church leaders refuse to share the glorious truth of creation. They discredit their message at large: If God is not big enough to create the universe in six days, how can he be big enough to redeem mankind?

Mary Medlen
Madison

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