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University of Alabama President Robert Witt, left, greets Terry and Nick Saban following a news conference in Tuscaloosa on Thursday. Terry says she 'can't wait to get into that stadium that has 92,000 screaming fans.'
AP photo by Michelle Williams
University of Alabama President Robert Witt, left, greets Terry and Nick Saban following a news conference in Tuscaloosa on Thursday. Terry says she "can't wait to get into that stadium that has 92,000 screaming fans."

A coal-miner's daughter
Saban's wife: I love the game

TUSCALOOSA (AP) — Terry Saban describes herself as a career coach's wife, who appears ready to accept the
duties that come with being the "first lady" of Alabama football.

"Football has been my life. I love the game," she told reporters shortly after learning her husband, Nick Saban, was leaving the Miami Dolphins and had been named the 27th head coach at The University of Alabama, the Birmingham News reported Thursday.

"I can't wait to get into that stadium that has 92,000 screaming fans," she said.

For nearly all of her 35-year marriage to Saban, Terry Saban has been a football coach's wife, moving from one city to another as her husband worked his way up from an assistant to a head coach, from college to the pros and back again.

Fittingly, it was on the football field that the Sabans' paths first crossed — young Nick playing for his father, Nick Sr., in the Pop Warner League and Terry was leading cheers on the sidelines.

She was a coal-miner's daughter.

But it wasn't until they were teenagers, when she was a majorette at East Fairmont and he was a three-sport athlete at nearby Monongah High, that Terry first grabbed Nick's attention.

They later attended Kent State University together and were married Dec. 18, 1971. She taught school and sold real estate before becoming a full-time coach's wife.

The mother of two teens — a son, Nicholas, 19, and a daughter, Kristen, 15 — Terry Saban has said she feels an obligation to get involved in the community.

While her husband was leading LSU to a national championship in 2003, she helped the Bengal Belles women's group raise money for a campus academic center.

In Miami, she helped run the Nick's Kids Foundation and handed out turkey dinners to needy families at Thanksgiving.

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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